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  • Giardiasis is an intestinal infection of man and animals cased by a microscopic protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis. Giardia is a simple one-celled parasitic species; it is not a "worm", bacteria, or virus. Giardiasis can be an important cause of diarrhea in animals and humans. However, many cats are infected without developing clinical signs or the diarrhea is treated as 'non-specific'.

  • While a favorite and healthy snack for people, grapes, raisins and currants can cause kidney failure in dogs. Raisins can commonly be found in combination with other foods, potentially increasing the risk of exposure as compared with grapes and currants.  The toxicity concern is the same. 

  • Dogs, in general, are amazing creatures. But service dogs like guide dogs, are true stand outs. In addition to traditional canine companionship, they play an integral role in the lives of the visually impaired.

  • There are many potential hazards that pets face especially during the holidays. With commonsense and planning exposure to these hazards can be avoided preventing or illness. Hazards include tinsel, electrical cords, string from meat, ribbons, Christmas tree water, holiday plants such as mistletoe, holly, and lilies, and foods such as chocolate and other human foods including bread dough. Some dogs will do better if given a safe space to stay away from company and may require calming remedies to help minimize anxiety and stress during the holidays.

  • Purebred dogs from a breeder have a documented family history and known background. For families who have opted for this way to add a dog to their family (if a shelter or rescue dog isn't in the cards), make sure you and the breeder take time to get to know each other to make sure that the family and dog are the right fit together. 

  • Dogs can suffer from hearing loss due to increasing age, chronic ear infections, or may be born with a defect. Deafness in dogs can present some challenges but overall, they can have a fairly healthy, normal life. Training is still possible by making some modifications and incorporating hand signals into the training regime. It is important to take their deafness into account when considering their safety and ensure that they are never off leash on or near a street.

  • Grief is the normal and natural response to the loss of someone or something. When grieving, one is said to be in a state of bereavement. The loss of a pet can cause intense grief and sorrow. Given that so many people consider their pets as members of the family, this grief is normal and understandable. Each person experiences grief in a different way. Contrary to popular belief, grief does not unfold in clean, linear stages, nor does it have a timeline. Grief is a full body experience that includes physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and spiritual responses. A healthy grief journey comes from taking the time to work through feelings rather than trying to push them away, moving toward the experience of loss to learn to live with it. There are many ways to manage grief, including receiving support from others, finding comfort in routines and play, keeping active, taking breaks from the sadness, remembering your pet, memorializing your pet, searching for meaning, and eventually, possibly bringing a new pet into your life. Grieving takes time. Usually it gradually lessens in intensity over time, but if it doesn’t, then professional counseling may help.

  • We celebrate our pets! We have cake on their birthdays. We wrap presents for them at Christmas. We buy them special toys when they are sick. When they pass on, we are sad, but isn't it fitting to celebrate one more time?

  • Mothballs are solid pesticides that slowly release a vapor to kill and repel moths, their larvae, and other insects from stored clothing and fabric. Mothballs are sometimes also used to repel snakes, mice, and other animals, although this use is not recommended and can be harmful to pets, children, and the environment.

  • Second opinions and referrals often cause great anxiety to cat owners, regardless of whether it is suggested by the veterinarian or considered by the cat owner. Sometimes, despite every effort, things do not go as planned and the attending clinician - the veterinarian treating the pet - suggests it might be beneficial considering a referral for a second opinion with another doctor.